Youth Arrows

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 contributors, and was last updated by kighty7 kighty7 2 years, 5 months ago.

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  • April 28, 2012 at 5:05 am #496669 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    I thought I’d share some experience with instructing Youth. I’ve instructed Youth from 1994 to 2004 under NFAA Instructor credentials, from single Cub Scout Dens to Girl Scout Jamborees, and everything in between.

    Having worked with wood shafts, even fiberglass shafts, and carbon shafts, the only shafts that I’ll now use is Easton Aluminum.

    Why? Because there is a safety aspect when instructing Youth that far surpasses instructing adults, and places much more responsibility on the Instructor. Aluminum shafts take less inspection and are much more durable than wood, fiberglass, or carbon. Unlike wood, fiberglass, or carbon they do not crack or split, especially on the nock end. The worse they can do is be bent and not shoot straight. Although I carry a $2,000,000 umbrella insurance policy, Aluminum is my favorite.

    One problem with Youth arrows is that they are generally heavy for the DW, range is limited, and often the arrow will not stick in the target. There is nothing more discouraging to a Youth than watching a perfect shot bounce out of the target and fall to the ground. The Saunders Combo point goes a long way to solving this problem. It is such a great penetrator that I discourage its use for adult bows … unless you like replacing bag targets on a regular basis.

    Here are the Youth arrow I recently built … with thanks to Bohning Archery for supplying the fletching Jigs and David Andrews (BowNazi) for supplying the Blazer vanes.
    Easton XX75 Blues, Blazer Vanes, Saunders Combo Points. I cut the swagged end off and fit Easton uni-bushings with G-nocks so that I can replace damaged nocks quickly … this keeps the kids in the game and shooting straight.

    April 28, 2012 at 12:13 pm #534371 Back to Top REPORT
    micky
    Micky

    Joined: 10/11/2004
    Good stuff right there. =D/>” title=”Applause” /><br />
Thanks for the tip, Brian.</div>


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    April 28, 2012 at 12:19 pm #534372 Back to Top REPORT
    jeronimo
    jeronimo

    Age: 45
    Joined: 2/18/2005
    Location: Quebec
    View My Bows
    is there any particular spine that is a good all around arrow for kids Brian ?
    i was thinking around 500-600 spine , or would that be way to stiff ? our club has a bunch of recurves and a dozen Genesis bows all at 30# or less. after not having a local club for the last 4 years we have finally found a place to open an outdoor range. official opening is next Saturday .
    April 28, 2012 at 2:32 pm #534373 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    For compound bows shot with a release, a shaft with a stiff spine will shoot very well, so it is better to be overly stiff than try to match dynamic spine, especially when a group of kids may have draw lengths that run from 22″ to 28″. The arrows in the pic above are 28″ Easton XX75 Blues 1716 ( .880″ spine) with 65-gr combo points, and will handle up to 30# and 28″ DL. I always opt for the larger wall thickness because the shafts are more durable and don’t bend so easily. Arrow speeds are from 130 fps to 175 fps out of the Youth compound I use, depending on the DW/DL set, but I don’t have the kids shooting beyond 20 yds, so speed isn’t all that important as long as the arrow reaches the target.

    Spine only becomes a real issue if the kids are shooting fingers, off the shelf of a longbow or recurve. There is nothing more discouraging to a kid than having arrows that fly way left or way right of where they are pointing…I see this all too often with kids shooting Youth longbows, and as expected, they loose interest rapidly. If a Trad setup is used, I shoot the bow myself, trying different point weights to tune the arrow until the shaft flys on the sight-target line. Another reason I like aluminum arrows is that I don’t have to fuss with finding the stiff side of the spine and when fletched with feathers they shoot great even if nocked upside down…which with kids is a 50/50 chance. ;)

    The .500 and .600 spine will be overly stiff for 30# Trad bows. To match spine for 30# bows and short DL, add 5# to the bows peak DW and use the Easton Shaft Selector or Chart … use RPS points of different weights so that the arrows can be ‘tuned’ to different DLs.
    http://www.eastonarchery.com/img/downlo … or2012.zip

    http://www.eastonarchery.com/uploads/fi … -chart.pdf

    May 2, 2012 at 10:10 pm #534374 Back to Top REPORT
    kighty7
    kighty7

    Joined: 11/26/2008
    Awesome.
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