What type of hunter are you?

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 25 contributors, and was last updated by  MX9799 3 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • September 30, 2011 at 2:23 pm #533439 Back to Top REPORT

    fluffy

    Joined: 4/6/2011
    big antlers are nice but I can’t say no to shooting when the opportunity presents itself.
    September 30, 2011 at 3:33 pm #533440 Back to Top REPORT
    l-o-s-t-arrow
    L.O.S.T.Arrow

    Joined: 5/16/2006
    Location: Alberta
    :D As an instructor for Hunter Ed and IBEP etc…we can reconise the 5 steps of an hunter…
    it is so true also…We all go thru them in some respect..some will pass stages quickly …other get stuck in a stage

    SHOOTER STAGE
    The hunter talks about satisfaction with hunting being closely tied to being able to “get shooting.” Often the beginning duck hunter will relate he had an excellent day if he got in a lot of shooting. The beginning deer hunter will talk about the number of shooting opportunities. Missing game means little to hunters in this phase. A beginning hunter wants to pull the trigger and test the capability of his firearm or bow. A hunter in this stage may be a dangerous hunting partner.

    LIMITING OUT STAGE
    A hunter still talks about satisfaction gained from shooting. But what seems more important is measuring success through the killing of game and the number of birds or animals shot. Limiting out, or filling a tag, is the absolute measure. Do not let your desire to limit out be stronger than the need for safe behavior at all times.

    TROPHY STAGE
    Satisfaction is described in terms of selectivity of game. A duck hunter might take only greenheads. A deer hunter looks for one special deer. A hunter might travel far to find a real trophy animal. Shooting opportunity and skills become less important.

    METHOD STAGE
    This hunter has all the special equipment. Hunting has become one of the most important things in his life. Satisfaction comes from the method that enables the hunter to take game. Taking game is important, but second to how it is taken. This hunter will study long and hard how best to pick a blind site, lay out decoys, and call in waterfowl. A deer hunter will go one on one with a white-tailed deer, studying sign, tracking, and the life habits of the deer. Often, the hunter will handicap himself by hunting only with black powder firearms or bow and arrow. Bagging game, or limiting, still is understood as being a necessary part of the hunt during this phase.

    SPORTSMAN STAGE
    As a hunter ages and after many years of hunting, he “mellows out.” Satisfaction now can be found in the total hunting experience. Being in the field, enjoying the company of friends and family, and seeing nature outweigh the need for taking game. Not all hunters go through all the stages, or go through them in that particular order. It is also possible for hunters who pursue several species of game to be in different stages with regard to each species. Some hunters feel that role models of good sportsmen, training, or reading books or magazines helped them pass more quickly through some stages.
    :D
    Neil

    September 30, 2011 at 4:17 pm #533441 Back to Top REPORT
    plinker22
    Plinker22

    Age: 51
    Joined: 2/24/2006
    Yep, another E. all the above. :)

    Just depends on the time of the season.

    "The party in Hades has been canceled due to fire.
    September 30, 2011 at 10:47 pm #533442 Back to Top REPORT
    pa_mathews_man
    PA_MATHEWS_MAN

    Joined: 2/22/2005
    Mature [=}=]
    October 1, 2011 at 1:46 am #533443 Back to Top REPORT
    ihocky2
    ihocky2

    Joined: 3/22/2011
    Another for all of the above. The first few weeks I’ll wait for a mature buck that might be a trophy. During the rut, I try to hold out for a trophy, but it depends on the freezer. I try to take a doe early on, in my area of PA there are two or three weeks of doe only before archery fully opens, so I try for a doe then. I’ll wait for a mature doe and try not to take one with a youngster until at least November.
    October 1, 2011 at 5:13 am #533444 Back to Top REPORT

    cjmay13

    Joined: 10/29/2008
    All of the above here also. I try to put a doe in the freezer early if one’s alone or a group of them all come in together. After one’s in the freezer it’s time to horn hunt and if the season is almost over and I have nothing then anything is fair game.
    October 1, 2011 at 5:35 am #533445 Back to Top REPORT
    wolbear
    wolbear

    Joined: 9/13/2005
    WOW! Guess I’m Mature by the first survey, but according to Neil I guess I’m in the Sportsman Phase. More important to watch the youngins’ get “The Fever” and spend time in the field with friends and family. :thumbup
    October 1, 2011 at 12:22 pm #533446 Back to Top REPORT

    conquestador

    Age: 64
    Joined: 12/10/2009
    Location: Upstate NY
    I opted for mature, but here’s the straight scoop. If a buck and doe come in together, the doe is the target unless the buck is a wall hanger. If a buck comes in alone, he’s the target. On the last day of the season, if my freezer is empty, a fawn may have my name on it.
    October 2, 2011 at 3:23 am #533447 Back to Top REPORT
    elkbow
    Elkbow

    Joined: 4/18/2005
    for elk, i purely trophy hunt until the final two days, unless there are alot of elk and bulls bugling, a big cow needs to be careful around me
    October 2, 2011 at 6:34 pm #533448 Back to Top REPORT

    MX9799

    Joined: 5/7/2008
    I don’t fall into the range of any of the options. I simply shoot a deer if I’m in the mood to kill one. It has nothing to do with meat, deer age, or antlers. If a deer walks by, and I have the urge to shoot a deer, I take the opportunity the lord has given me and shoot the deer.

    All that being said, I don’t have the heart to shoot a fawn, for whatever reason.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)