Trail Camera’s

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 8 contributors, and was last updated by crazystups CrazyStups 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • December 29, 2012 at 1:11 am #497392 Back to Top REPORT

    Stouty

    Joined: 12/22/2012
    Over Christmas I bought a new trail camera. (First One.) I have recently set it up but where should I put it? How far from my stand you recommend.
    December 29, 2012 at 3:36 am #545439 Back to Top REPORT

    mich

    Joined: 12/2/2008
    Put it about 20 yds away over a corn pile. What kind did you get?
    December 29, 2012 at 4:36 am #545440 Back to Top REPORT
    backhalfed
    backhalfed

    Joined: 10/5/2007
    Location: Ohio
    View My Bows
    Alot depends on where you are…Corn here does nothing for me bt pull in does during the late season. I’m in the Mid west (Ohio) and minerals in the spring will be your friend ,I try and get my minerals refreashed in May and run my cam on the meneral site all through season. I put out a bucket of Lucky Buck and one Trophy Rock and have great results with it :thumbup
    December 29, 2012 at 4:46 am #545441 Back to Top REPORT
    nscott88
    nscott88

    Age: 24
    Joined: 2/10/2009
    I would set your camera up 15 or 20 feet away from whatever you have, trail or bait, that way at night you have no problems getting them on cam. I would set it up at 3ft-ish looking straight or you can set it up alittle higher angled down slightly. :thumbup
    December 29, 2012 at 11:22 am #545442 Back to Top REPORT

    Aitch

    Joined: 12/2/2012
    scrapes are a good place to set up a camera.. Deer will use the licking branches year round. Thats the best way I have found to get an inventory of the deer around your area. If you are putting it on a trail, aim it down the trail.. do not intersect the trail with it.. If you are aiming it down the trail, you have a better chance of getting good pictures. I usually dont put bait out for my cameras… I like to get the deer on their natural movement.. If you do put bait out, try to spread it out as much as possible.
    December 29, 2012 at 9:18 pm #545443 Back to Top REPORT

    Stouty

    Joined: 12/22/2012
    As of right now my stand is between to banks, after late bow season going to move in down onto another ridge over looking a flat and about 200 yards behind is a field in which the deer walk the flats to get. Would place be best to place it facing the field of on the edge of the field facing my stand. I would think the second would get better pictures. The camera is a Tasco picked it up at walmart on sale for $50 I figured since it was my first no need to rush into the expensive ones yet.
    December 30, 2012 at 12:02 pm #545444 Back to Top REPORT
    bobbor76
    bobbor76

    Age: 66
    Joined: 11/26/2004
    Location: South Dakota
    Most cameras seem to work better if you can place them to face either to the North or to the South. That way you avoid looking directly into the sun. :thumbup

    Placing it in or near the field will tell you what deer are using the field. Placing it near your stand and looking towards the field will tell you if you have a chance for a shot.

    Use the same care with scent control when placing the camera as you do when hunting. The deer can smell the camera, your odors, and any bug spray you might use. Using the light weight latex gloves isn’t a bad idea.

    Unless you are using bait, or a feeding station, generally you will only photograph a mature buck once. Then he will avoid the camera. I’ve swung the camera around 180 degrees and caught the same mature buck sneeking past the camera. Move the camera 50 feet and you might get him again. :thumbup

    Proud Member of yet to be named TEAM 3
    January 3, 2013 at 2:54 pm #545445 Back to Top REPORT
    archer2
    archer2

    Joined: 2/19/2008
    Put it about 20 yds away over a corn pile. What kind did you get?

    20 yards is 60 feet and that is too far. Most of today’s cameras are not even rated for a 60 foot flash range.

    Most cameras are rated for 40 -50 foot flash ranges and that is with a good camera. I would try to keep the camera under that distance to ensure good quality photos.

    January 3, 2013 at 3:49 pm #545446 Back to Top REPORT
    crazystups
    CrazyStups

    Joined: 9/13/2005
    Another tip is to set it up facing north that way the sun will never be in your photos. :thumbup
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)