String stop on an indoor target bow?

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 contributors, and was last updated by gjarcher gjarcher 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • April 15, 2009 at 4:26 am #496143 Back to Top REPORT

    TackDrivingLD

    Joined: 4/9/2008
    So I’m sitting here drooling over my shiny new Apex 7, and I’m going back and forth about whether or not to put a Dead End string stop on it. Here are the two sides of the fight that’s going on inside my head right now:

    Thought #1: It ain’t broke so don’t fix it. Vibration and noise mean nothing because this bow is just for indoor spots. Who knows, the string stop might mess up the bow’s tuning or make my groups larger (would it? could it?)

    but on the other hand…

    Thought #2: Last year I had a terrifying dryfire incident with my DLD due to a broken nock… my STS took the full force of the blow, and as a result my bow was completely fine! For the minimal cost of this thing, it never hurts to have an extra layer of protection!

    So pretty much if it doesn’t negatively impact accuracy, I’d like to put one on. I’ve NEVER seen anyone use one on a target bow though…

    Ok what do you guys think?

    April 15, 2009 at 5:24 am #525476 Back to Top REPORT
    wishbone
    wishbone

    Joined: 2/6/2007
    If it makes you feel better , then why not.. [=}=]
    April 15, 2009 at 10:37 am #525477 Back to Top REPORT
    javi
    JAVI

    Joined: 7/5/2006
    wearing a raincoat while standing otherwise naked in the shower is still wearing a raincoat. :D
    April 15, 2009 at 12:06 pm #525478 Back to Top REPORT

    TackDrivingLD

    Joined: 4/9/2008
    wearing a raincoat while standing otherwise naked in the shower is still wearing a raincoat. :D

    Apparently Yoda has a bow :^O (Thanks Mike :thumbup )

    So you guys don’t think these things negatively impact tune / accuracy?

    April 15, 2009 at 12:26 pm #525479 Back to Top REPORT
    blood-bath2006
    Blood Bath2006

    Joined: 10/14/2006

    wearing a raincoat while standing otherwise naked in the shower is still wearing a raincoat. :D

    Apparently Yoda has a bow :^O (Thanks Mike :thumbup )

    So you guys don’t think these things negatively impact tune / accuracy?[/quote:7r07a8ov]

    Nope. Zero need for it, but it won’t hurt either. If you want it, then use it [=}=]

    April 15, 2009 at 3:04 pm #525480 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    String stops are like any other accessory, it has to be setup properly to work correctly. Its purpose is to ostensibly quiet the bow by reducing the string oscillations. For that to happen, and to not just transmit the energy through the rod into the riser, the material has to have the exact correct amount of compressibility. Just like shocks on a truck, too soft and they bottom out, dampening is insufficient and energy is transmitted to the frame, to stiff and it transmits the energy to the frame more than it dampens. Like shocks, the string stop has to be tuned to be effective … and that means if you change DW, arrow weight, etc. the tuning requirements also change. I consider the design or the Dead End and C.T.A. to be better than just a hunk of Navcom material on the end of a stiff metal rod. [=}=]

    Assuming the string stop is tuned perfectly, then the question arises about how effective it is on a particular bow. If a bow has a lot of vibration (noise) or string oscillation, most older non-parallel limb bows fit into that category, then a string stop can make a noticeable difference. If a bow has little vibration or string oscillation, most parallel limb bows fit into that category, then there is little work for the string stop to do and any effect would be small.

    Claims that the string stop improves accuracy lack any evidence that can’t be explained by poor nock fit, IMHO. Accuracy only depends on the nock separating consistently from the string at the same moment in the string’s travel to achieve consistent arrow velocity. Proper fitting nocks do that. A string stop theoretically could force a poor fitting nock to do that also, thus an accuracy improvement would be noticed. But, this is accuracy at extended ranges, not at 18m where variations in velocity mean little. At best the argument for string stops improving accuracy is that they are a band-aid on a problem.

    Claims that the string stop increases arrow speed likewise lack any evidence that can’t be explained by poor nock fit. I have shoot through a chronograph with and without a string stop to show there is no velocity change with a proper fitting nock. I have also shot test groups at 20 yds with a Drenalin fitted with an STS and without an STS and consistently stayed in the X-ring. Any accuracy improvement came from arrow vane control and FOC…

    With and Without

    With…

    Without …

    I see no useful purpose for a string stop for target shooting unless you are shooting an older, non-parallel limb bow that is beating you to death, like my Browning 6T6 with the hatchet cams. Frankly, I have tried an STS on it, with Limbsavers and String Leeches, and the bow destroyed the String Leeches in less than 100 shots, and the Limbsavers didn’t last more than about 500 shots, and the EDS stopper was too soft with most of the energy transmitted into the riser and the string blowing by it, wearing it out … the end result was disappointing.

    … but I use a string stop on my hunting bows to prevent string slap on bulky camo clothing, raingear, 3D leafy suit, etc.

    Just my :2cents

    April 16, 2009 at 12:18 pm #525481 Back to Top REPORT

    TackDrivingLD

    Joined: 4/9/2008
    WOW! :shock: Thanks so much for all the usefull info Brian! I’d consider this one pretty much answered… =D/>” title=”Applause” /></div>


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    April 16, 2009 at 2:40 pm #525482 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    Its not the first time the issue has been raised. All the differing opinions on effectiveness, accuracy, and speed a year or two back got my curiousity up.

    A string stop/suppressor is just another accessory … you have to decide for yourself if you really want/need it. Does the Monster need a string stop since it doesn’t have suppressor arms? … I ordered mine without the Dead End, just to find out. ;)

    I don’t know if most bow manufacturers are including string stops on their new releases because they really work that well, or if they realized that bows sold better with them, like a putting a chrome grill on a truck. :smt69

    To my thinking, if they quiet the bow they make a lot more sense than loading weight on the string and slowing the arrow to reduce noise. In my experience, the string stop does change the sound from a Twang to a Thunk. Does game know the difference? … if not, I believe they learn quick. [=}=]

    For those who really want a quiet bow, this is a must read article, probably the best thought out one I’ve read …
    http://www.bowhunting.net/artman/publis … oise.shtml

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