shed hunting tips!!

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 8 contributors, and was last updated by bookemdano Bookemdano 1 year, 1 month ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • February 16, 2013 at 3:38 pm #498280 Back to Top REPORT

    buckmaster18

    Joined: 11/13/2012
    really needing some shed hunting tips! iv been out once but found nothing anything helps! thanks!!
    February 16, 2013 at 10:56 pm #553522 Back to Top REPORT
    macolos
    MACOLOS

    Age: 74
    Joined: 3/20/2010
    Location: WI
    Photo Gallery
    The best is with a dog. You will at times find them, depends a lot on the landscape. The best is with a dog that is trained and well reworded when a shed is found. You will find most in the deep grass in the marsh and creek bottom’s. Just got mine trained good and lost her to cancer and am now ready to find a new little female Black Lab. I think I am healed enough to do this and the time of year is right. Been looking but some of the good stock is way out of my range. $1500 and up is more than I am worth. Then you add in the vet, training, food and a couple dozen birds you get to the $3000 real soon. #-o
    Bow hunt, fly fish A friend is someone who knows everything about you, but still likes you!
    February 18, 2013 at 12:10 am #553523 Back to Top REPORT
    timmer90
    timmer90

    Joined: 3/15/2009
    Try between bedding and feeding areas, check any fence lines or ditches when they jump over they jolt and fall off. Follow any trails and check thickets .
    February 18, 2013 at 1:24 am #553524 Back to Top REPORT
    paslayer
    paslayer

    Joined: 11/10/2010
    It all depends on your location, but there are those factorst that apply everywhere. Feeding and Bedding areas are of course your #1, follow trails to and from. Our biggest help here is getting out with a few day old snow and seeing where they have been spending their time. even when there is still antler on their heads. Helps get ya ready and in shape. They say South and east facing slopes, where the deer avoid the wind and the hills get the most sun for food exposure. Fence lines are always key as well, good for a base search to start with. Walk slow and keep those eyes on the ground. bionoculars are nice for glassing and saving time while trying to determine stick from bone. Get high vantage points, cover lots of ground and best of all practice!
    February 18, 2013 at 1:43 am #553525 Back to Top REPORT
    statedriller
    statedriller

    Joined: 9/15/2006
    Location: Call me...867-5309
    Look where the deer are and take a set of binos with you.
    The end is near....
    February 18, 2013 at 7:32 am #553526 Back to Top REPORT
    pete
    pete

    Age: 46
    Joined: 4/22/2010
    you sure they’ve dropped them already?
    "it's funny how it's the little things in life that mean the most" - zac brown
    February 20, 2013 at 6:55 am #560640 Back to Top REPORT
    jemyers10pt
    jemyers10pt

    Joined: 7/18/2008
    Location: Ohio
    This is the only time of the year that I go into the bedding area. But the transition areas between bed and feed is where I find most of mine. Good luck and don’t give up.
    Always looking for my next Booner!
    February 20, 2013 at 8:23 pm #561118 Back to Top REPORT
    bookemdano
    Bookemdano

    Age: 42
    Joined: 1/15/2011
    Location: Manitoba
    Any suggestions for big woods that don’t really have clear bedding or feeding areas?
    I have been looking for cedar thickets and pine stands as bedding areas, but the deer pretty much eat and sleep everywhere in the forrest I hunt.
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