Question for woodworkers, making a table, stain opions neede

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 contributors, and was last updated by bbeltram bbeltram 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • January 21, 2013 at 11:52 pm #497714 Back to Top REPORT
    afterburner
    afterburner

    Joined: 11/10/2004
    Hey guys, got out to the garage and decided to make a coffee table out of some poplar that I have, my question is how with the use of dyes or whatever , stain. How would I stain this poplar to still get a good look with the deep purple, but I want like a walnut type tone…anyone have experience with poplar and getting the green tinge out and still making it pop. These pics are my planing the poplar and getting the top ready to be joined.

    January 22, 2013 at 12:29 am #548305 Back to Top REPORT
    straightedge123
    StraightEdge123

    Joined: 10/22/2007
    The purple heartwood of the yellow poplar will only slightly accept stain. Reason being is that the heartwood is that color because of extractives that make up the heartwood. To some degree they will negate the coloring of the stain.

    In some ways you might get a better patina and look if you go with a urethane. It will, of course, darken with age, so go lighter than what you want to end up with for a color.

    [=}=]

    Mathews S2 / Copper John 4-pin / QAD HD LD / Worlds Best Strings / 808 Bowslings / Easton Bloodlines
    January 22, 2013 at 1:05 am #548306 Back to Top REPORT

    nebo

    Joined: 1/8/2007
    Sounds like you got some good advise already. I wouldn’t stain it at all. I would use and good oil then use a oil base varnish. If you go that route use an outdoor type varnish it’s stands up very good. The color of that wood is nice I wouldn’t want to cover that up with stain. Just saying.
    January 22, 2013 at 1:08 am #548307 Back to Top REPORT
    afterburner
    afterburner

    Joined: 11/10/2004
    Sounds like you got some good advise already. I wouldn’t stain it at all. I would use and good oil then use a oil base varnish. If you go that route use an outdoor type varnish it’s stands up very good. The color of that wood is nice I wouldn’t want to cover that up with stain. Just saying.

    I agree, I have some more lumber that has some more of the heart in it so I just might have to live with the light lumber, my wife likes the darker lumber but she may lose this battle!!! ;)

    January 22, 2013 at 1:52 am #548308 Back to Top REPORT
    obsessedxt-2
    Obsessed/XT

    Joined: 1/22/2007
    If you want to keep it close to the color it is now I’d go with a water based polyurathane, it will protect it and it doesnt yellow over time like oil based.
    January 22, 2013 at 1:56 am #548309 Back to Top REPORT
    ohio-swb
    Ohio SWB

    Age: 48
    Joined: 3/1/2006
    Location: Ohio
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    i sometime use Catalyzed varnish on light color wood .or use oil base .
    best to damp cloth and dry one for wipe off .
    -}}}--------------------> shooting Helim and now switchy is retire hangin on the wall!
    January 22, 2013 at 5:04 am #548310 Back to Top REPORT
    bbeltram
    bbeltram

    Joined: 1/20/2008
    Kevin is right on the money. Around here, poplar is typically used for painted furniture/cabinets. It is a relatively soft wood that tends to blotch some, so I would consider using a wood conditioner prior to staining. Using a wiping stain rather than a penetrating stain will also help. I’ve used “Old Masters” brand wiping stain with good results. If you want uniform color, I’d cut out as much of the purple heartwood as possible unless you’re going with a very dark color.

    If you’re set up to spray your finish, a catalyzed lacquer will keep your color true. It also leaves a very hard finish that is resistant to water & chemicals. ML Campbel’s “Magnalac” is a great product that lays down nicely, dries quickly between coats and sands very easily.

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