maybe changing back to fiber optic but need help

Home Forums General Archery Discussion maybe changing back to fiber optic but need help

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 contributors, and was last updated by  Shogun1 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • April 22, 2013 at 5:43 am #574928 Back to Top REPORT
    mikeday
    mikeday

    Joined: 2/28/2012
    for over 15 years i have been shooting a red dot scope on my bows..(no peep/no kisser)  when I got glasses it made it difficult to shoot a pin site with peep as i would get double vision looking thru my glasses at that kind of angle..i tried everything to get it right and never could.  now im thinking on trying it again as hopefully things have changed enough to make that skewed issues gone.. any suggestions from anyone who had this issue and did / or used something that took it away?

    thanks

    April 22, 2013 at 9:04 am #574942 Back to Top REPORT
    caswell80
    caswell80

    Joined: 2/13/2008
    Location: Michigan
    I also shot a red dot for a number of years and had great success hunting with that system.  However as I became more involved with shooting 3d and practicing at longer distances it was not always the best choice.

    I started with a multi pin sight but have settled on a single pin movable sight.  This just seemed the natural fit to keep my sight picture clutter free (like the red dot)but allow me to shoot longer distances if necessary.  When I am hunting I set it at 25 yds and go!  90% of my shots are under 20 yds where I hunt.  Last fall a doe came in and stopped right at 30…I never hesitated and centered the pin (set at 25) on her vitals which resulted in a heart shot.  The few spots that I hunt field edges I would have time to move my sight if needed for  a longer shot.  I usually try and set my stands so even in these situations the deer come closer.

    Also if you have been shooting the red dot for 15 years my guess is the last time you used a pin and peep the peep was small and you centered the pin in the peep…just guessing (very limiting in low light hunting conditions).  With the larger peeps (I prefer a 1/4″ peep) and centering the scope housing in the peep the low light problem has not been an issue at all!

    Nose to string, scope housing centered in peep and I am good to go!  I am so glad that I took the time to play with and try things that were new to me at that time.  I am shooting better then ever.

    Just my 2 cents.  I did not have the same problem as you concerning your eyes but not many people shoot red dots so I thought I would let you know what has worked for me.  Have a great day!

    Sam {#emotions_dlg.mathews_thumbs_up}

    April 22, 2013 at 1:07 pm #574987 Back to Top REPORT
    mikeday
    mikeday

    Joined: 2/28/2012
    thanks for the insight Sam….I have shot a pin a few years ago when I went elk hunting in Idaho (they do not allow battery opperated sights) so I had to deal with it and remember it being frustrating when my glasses slid down my face (that is when I would have a double image problem..I was using a meta peep (i think is what it was called but not sure on the size)
    April 22, 2013 at 9:06 pm #575075 Back to Top REPORT
    caswell80
    caswell80

    Joined: 2/13/2008
    Location: Michigan
    No problem!  Sorry I don’t have anything for you with the glasses.  I hope it works out for you!
    April 23, 2013 at 11:33 pm #575289 Back to Top REPORT

    Shogun1

    Age: 56
    Joined: 10/29/2007
    Location: AL
    View My Bows
    First, if your form is perfect (that’s a big if) — you don’t really need a peep as another anchor reference.  Some on here derisively call them training wheels.

    As for me — I’m with Sam.  Get the peep big enough to center the front sight housing.

    Anchor references — knuckle in jaw, nose on string, and front housing centered in the peep aperture.

    Settle the pin on the desired impact point or aim off point and commit to the shot.

    Other issues that may warrant exploration — what color do you see best?  I tend to lose yellow in the woods so haven’t used yellow pins now for years.  I see green best — so have converted my sights to all green pins.

    Can you see better closer or further?  Have you considered trying a sight on an extension rail — like the Axcel Armor Tech HD?  There are others that are extended like that as well.  If you start to play with one of those  to try to find the ideal sight radius for yourself, you’ll want to be changing peep apertures — so I would suggest going to something like the superball peeps that have screw in apertures.  It will make matching the front sight size and the peep size easier than having to repeatedly remove and replace peeps.

    Also check your posture at full draw.  If the string is on your nose at anchor, you should be looking through the left corner of the right lens of your glasses (assuming you’re right handed).  If you are stretching your neck forward to set anchor you are probably also rotating your face a little further to the right (away from the target).  If you are standing erect and simply turn your head to look across your bow hand at full draw and then bring the peep into alignment with your eye (rather than the other way around — moving your eye to the peep), you should be able to see through your glasses a little more easily.

    Speaking of glasses — are you using progressive lenses or bi-/tri-focals?  As I understand the progressive lense design, the prescription changes gradually from what you need up close through what you need at mid ranges to what you need at long ranges.  If you’re looking through the portion of the lense that is ground for the wrong need, your vision will be distorted.

    I’m fortunate that I can still see at distance, but I need my glasses for up close work.  If I had to choose which to see more clearly for this sport — I would choose the abililty to see clearly at long range over the ability to see clearly up close.  Not planning to shoot many targets between my sight head and my eye — if you know what I mean.  So even if you need bi-focals — consider using just your long range prescription when you get down to the aiming part of the sport–so consider tucking your chin just a smidgen to put your line of sight through that portion of the lens.

    Leadership is 24/7/365. You are always leading by example ... Somebody is always watching--even if it is just you.
    April 24, 2013 at 5:34 am #575295 Back to Top REPORT
    mikeday
    mikeday

    Joined: 2/28/2012

    First, if your form is perfect (that’s a big if) — you don’t really need a peep as another anchor reference. Some on here derisively call them training wheels. 

    As for me — I’m with Sam. Get the peep big enough to center the front sight housing.

    Anchor references — knuckle in jaw, nose on string, and front housing centered in the peep aperture.

    Settle the pin on the desired impact point or aim off point and commit to the shot.

    Other issues that may warrant exploration — what color do you see best? I tend to lose yellow in the woods so haven’t used yellow pins now for years. I see green best — so have converted my sights to all green pins.

    Can you see better closer or further? Have you considered trying a sight on an extension rail — like the Axcel Armor Tech HD? There are others that are extended like that as well. If you start to play with one of those to try to find the ideal sight radius for yourself, you’ll want to be changing peep apertures — so I would suggest going to something like the superball peeps that have screw in apertures. It will make matching the front sight size and the peep size easier than having to repeatedly remove and replace peeps.

    Also check your posture at full draw. If the string is on your nose at anchor, you should be looking through the left corner of the right lens of your glasses (assuming you’re right handed). If you are stretching your neck forward to set anchor you are probably also rotating your face a little further to the right (away from the target). If you are standing erect and simply turn your head to look across your bow hand at full draw and then bring the peep into alignment with your eye (rather than the other way around — moving your eye to the peep), you should be able to see through your glasses a little more easily.

    Speaking of glasses — are you using progressive lenses or bi-/tri-focals? As I understand the progressive lense design, the prescription changes gradually from what you need up close through what you need at mid ranges to what you need at long ranges. If you’re looking through the portion of the lense that is ground for the wrong need, your vision will be distorted.

    I’m fortunate that I can still see at distance, but I need my glasses for up close work. If I had to choose which to see more clearly for this sport — I would choose the abililty to see clearly at long range over the ability to see clearly up close. Not planning to shoot many targets between my sight head and my eye — if you know what I mean. So even if you need bi-focals — consider using just your long range prescription when you get down to the aiming part of the sport–so considertucking your chin just a smidgen to put your line of sight through that portion of the lens.

    that is a lot of good info and help…thank you I will try some of those suggestions

    April 24, 2013 at 6:17 am #575296 Back to Top REPORT
    statedriller
    statedriller

    Joined: 9/15/2006
    Location: Call me...867-5309
    And get some good fitting glasses.  I have the Flexon ones that are basically spring steel.  They kinda grip the side of your head so they don’t slide down at all.
    The end is near....
    April 24, 2013 at 8:24 am #575310 Back to Top REPORT
    caswell80
    caswell80

    Joined: 2/13/2008
    Location: Michigan

    First, if your form is perfect (that’s a big if) — you don’t really need a peep as another anchor reference. Some on here derisively call them training wheels. 

    As for me — I’m with Sam. Get the peep big enough to center the front sight housing.

    Anchor references — knuckle in jaw, nose on string, and front housing centered in the peep aperture.

    Settle the pin on the desired impact point or aim off point and commit to the shot.

    Other issues that may warrant exploration — what color do you see best? I tend to lose yellow in the woods so haven’t used yellow pins now for years. I see green best — so have converted my sights to all green pins.

    Can you see better closer or further? Have you considered trying a sight on an extension rail — like the Axcel Armor Tech HD? There are others that are extended like that as well. If you start to play with one of those to try to find the ideal sight radius for yourself, you’ll want to be changing peep apertures — so I would suggest going to something like the superball peeps that have screw in apertures. It will make matching the front sight size and the peep size easier than having to repeatedly remove and replace peeps.

    Also check your posture at full draw. If the string is on your nose at anchor, you should be looking through the left corner of the right lens of your glasses (assuming you’re right handed). If you are stretching your neck forward to set anchor you are probably also rotating your face a little further to the right (away from the target). If you are standing erect and simply turn your head to look across your bow hand at full draw and then bring the peep into alignment with your eye (rather than the other way around — moving your eye to the peep), you should be able to see through your glasses a little more easily.

    Speaking of glasses — are you using progressive lenses or bi-/tri-focals? As I understand the progressive lense design, the prescription changes gradually from what you need up close through what you need at mid ranges to what you need at long ranges. If you’re looking through the portion of the lense that is ground for the wrong need, your vision will be distorted.

    I’m fortunate that I can still see at distance, but I need my glasses for up close work. If I had to choose which to see more clearly for this sport — I would choose the abililty to see clearly at long range over the ability to see clearly up close. Not planning to shoot many targets between my sight head and my eye — if you know what I mean. So even if you need bi-focals — consider using just your long range prescription when you get down to the aiming part of the sport–so considertucking your chin just a smidgen to put your line of sight through that portion of the lens.

    Good points and great job explaining them Shogun!  I forgot to mention the knuckle in the jaw as far as another anchor reference…but that is spot on!

    {#emotions_dlg.mathews_thumbs_up}

    April 24, 2013 at 4:47 pm #575398 Back to Top REPORT

    Shogun1

    Age: 56
    Joined: 10/29/2007
    Location: AL
    View My Bows

    Good points and great job explaining them Shogun! I forgot to mention the knuckle in the jaw as far as another anchor reference…but that is spot on! {#emotions_dlg.mathews_thumbs_up}

    Just trying to help out.  Thank you for the feedback.

    Leadership is 24/7/365. You are always leading by example ... Somebody is always watching--even if it is just you.
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)