Holding Steady/New Stabilizer

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 contributors, and was last updated by  Remy003 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • April 1, 2013 at 5:31 am #572312 Back to Top REPORT

    Remy003

    Joined: 2/15/2013
    Hi everyone, I would like some advice on either a new stabilizer or tips to holding my bow steady. I’ve got a 5″, 5.5# Vibracheck Flexxtech stabilizer. I’m looking at Ktech or Axion for a new one. Any tips advice or recommendations would be apprieciated.
    April 1, 2013 at 8:44 am #572331 Back to Top REPORT
    yellowcrk30
    yellowcrk30

    Joined: 7/4/2012
    I’ve used ktech and liked them pretty good but I will be switching to a dead center stabilizer

    Sent from

    April 1, 2013 at 10:38 am #572348 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    Before you can use a stabilizer to hold steady, you must get the DL correct and the bow setup/tuned correctly and possibly correct some form issues.

    If the sight picture is herky-jerky, the DL is most likely too short. If the sight picture is a large, persistent wander that never really settles about aim point and there is a tendency for the sight to drop below the aim point the longer you get into the shot and it is difficult to raise the sight up, then the DL is likely too long.

    Once the DL is correct, then you must set the bow up to the center of pull, the centroid of torques. You do this by mounting the arrow so its centerline is supported at the berger hole (rest mount hole) centerline when the rest’s launcher is full up at full draw. Then the bow is paper tuned for a bullet hole at the minimum of two distances, usually 5′ and 10′ are good enough, three distances is  better. Then walk back tune. For ease of tuning and the most consistency, make sure the nock fit is correct (snaps on but will slide easily on the centerserving) and there is no nock pinch at full draw (leave about 1/16″ gap below the nock for lower nock set/D-Loop knot or release eliminator button).

    When the above is done, and not before, you are ready to work on getting a steady, predictable, sight picture using the bow balance and stabilizer lengthXweight combination for the DW, mass weight, and letoff of your bow. This article by George Ryals IV (GRIV) explains the process (if you are limited to a short stab, then you’ll be working mostly with weights and need a stab that accepts weights). You may not be able to work with some factors, like letoff adjustments, so you will be limited to bow mass and peak DW adjustments.

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisation.pdf

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisersgriv.pdf

    There are form issues that can affect how steady one holds. To much weight on the back foot will make for an unsteady shooting stance, a habit of leaning back  and not standing upright, bending the head forward into the string and not keeping a “T” form, standing with a closed/square stance makes for an unsteady foundation, especially when shooting up/down hill or in wind.

    There are a number of factors to consider and nobody holds rock steady, that is not humanly possible … hope this helps. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

    April 1, 2013 at 7:26 pm #572431 Back to Top REPORT
    sticks
    sticks

    Joined: 2/5/2005
    View My Bows

    Before you can use a stabilizer to hold steady, you must get the DL correct and the bow setup/tuned correctly and possibly correct some form issues. 

    If the sight picture is herky-jerky, the DL is most likely too short. If the sight picture is a large, persistent wander that never really settles about aim point and there is a tendency for the sight to drop below the aim point the longer you get into the shot and it is difficult to raise the sight up, then the DL is likely too long.

    Once the DL is correct, then you must set the bow up to the center of pull, the centroid of torques. You do this by mounting the arrow so its centerline is supported at the berger hole (rest mount hole) centerline when the rest’s launcher is full up at full draw. Then the bow is paper tuned for a bullet hole at the minimum of two distances, usually 5′ and 10′ are good enough, three distances is better. Then walk back tune. For ease of tuning and the most consistency, make sure the nock fit is correct (snaps on but will slide easily on the centerserving) and there is no nock pinch at full draw (leave about 1/16″ gap below the nock for lower nock set/D-Loop knot or release eliminator button).

    When the above is done, and not before, you are ready to work on getting a steady, predictable, sight picture using the bow balance and stabilizer lengthXweight combination for the DW, mass weight,and letoff of your bow. This article by George Ryals IV (GRIV) explains the process (if you are limited to a short stab, then you’ll be working mostly with weights and need a stab that accepts weights). You may not be able to work with some factors, like letoff adjustments, so you will be limited to bow mass and peak DW adjustments.

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisation.pdf

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisersgriv.pdf

    There are form issues that can affect how steady one holds. To much weight on the back foot will make for an unsteady shooting stance, a habit of leaning back and not standing upright, bending the head forward into the string and not keeping a “T” form, standing with a closed/square stance makes for an unsteady foundation, especially when shooting up/down hill or in wind.

    There are a number of factors to consider and nobody holds rock steady, that is not humanly possible … hope this helps. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

    {#emotions_dlg.misc_bow} Brian you are the Man!!!

    How are you living your Dash?
    April 2, 2013 at 12:05 am #572469 Back to Top REPORT

    Remy003

    Joined: 2/15/2013

    Before you can use a stabilizer to hold steady, you must get the DL correct and the bow setup/tuned correctly and possibly correct some form issues. 

    If the sight picture is herky-jerky, the DL is most likely too short. If the sight picture is a large, persistent wander that never really settles about aim point and there is a tendency for the sight to drop below the aim point the longer you get into the shot and it is difficult to raise the sight up, then the DL is likely too long.

    Once the DL is correct, then you must set the bow up to the center of pull, the centroid of torques. You do this by mounting the arrow so its centerline is supported at the berger hole (rest mount hole) centerline when the rest’s launcher is full up at full draw. Then the bow is paper tuned for a bullet hole at the minimum of two distances, usually 5′ and 10′ are good enough, three distances is better. Then walk back tune. For ease of tuning and the most consistency, make sure the nock fit is correct (snaps on but will slide easily on the centerserving) and there is no nock pinch at full draw (leave about 1/16″ gap below the nock for lower nock set/D-Loop knot or release eliminator button).

    When the above is done, and not before, you are ready to work on getting a steady, predictable, sight picture using the bow balance and stabilizer lengthXweight combination for the DW, mass weight,and letoff of your bow. This article by George Ryals IV (GRIV) explains the process (if you are limited to a short stab, then you’ll be working mostly with weights and need a stab that accepts weights). You may not be able to work with some factors, like letoff adjustments, so you will be limited to bow mass and peak DW adjustments.

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisation.pdf

    http://www.bronte-archers.org.uk/Wordpress/wp-content/uploads/archery_articles/stabilisersgriv.pdf

    There are form issues that can affect how steady one holds. To much weight on the back foot will make for an unsteady shooting stance, a habit of leaning back and not standing upright, bending the head forward into the string and not keeping a “T” form, standing with a closed/square stance makes for an unsteady foundation, especially when shooting up/down hill or in wind.

    There are a number of factors to consider and nobody holds rock steady, that is not humanly possible … hope this helps. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

    Thanks, I think my draw length is half an inch short at 24″but my Mission Craze won’t adjust in half inch increments.

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