fall rye and clover

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 contributors, and was last updated by  warningshot 8 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • July 27, 2013 at 8:55 pm #586058 Back to Top REPORT

    warningshot

    Joined: 6/23/2010
    i have a plot of fall rye and clover …the rye is 4 feet high and has turned yellow will the seed fall to ground or do i have to knock it off mow it  or just let it fall …want to let the plot ride as i saw 3 deer in it tonight
    July 29, 2013 at 10:01 am #586225 Back to Top REPORT
    q2hunter
    q2hunter

    Joined: 6/21/2007
    Location: Virginia
    If you want the clover to come in full, you may want to bush hog the rye.  Most rye seed is hybrid and the seeds will not germinate.  Sounds like you planted this in the spring? Deer like the tender young shoots of rye most, although they will nibble at the seed pods a little.  The deer you seen are probably eating the clover down in the bottom under the rye.  If the clover is coming on, it should really explode and fill in as a full fledged clover plot if you bush hod the rye.  Deer will REALLY hit the clover also in early fall and up until it gets frosted on a couple times.  If you want the most potential out of your clover, keep watch on it and bush hog it also every time if blooms.  You want to wait until about 75% of your blooms have turned brown, which is when the seed in the blooms have matured and are ready to be dispersed, and bush hog it then.  What that does is puts the clover into panic mode as it thinks it didn’t do its job for the year.  It will regenerate and bloom again.  If mowed at the proper time, the clover will rebloom about every 30 days.  Through the growing phases of clover, there is about a 10 day period in every 30 day cycle when it peaks very high in nutrients, palletability, and attractiveness to deer.  If you do not mow it, it will bloom one major time, cycle through the above one major time, and kind of go dormant for the remainder of the year.
    July 29, 2013 at 10:02 pm #586323 Back to Top REPORT

    warningshot

    Joined: 6/23/2010

    If you want the clover to come in full, you may want to bush hog the rye. Most rye seed is hybrid and the seeds will not germinate. Sounds like you planted this in the spring? Deer like the tender young shoots of rye most, although they will nibble at the seed pods a little. The deer you seen are probably eating the clover down in the bottom under the rye. If the clover is coming on, it should really explode and fill in as a full fledged clover plot if you bush hod the rye. Deer will REALLY hit the clover also in early fall and up until it gets frosted on a couple times. If you want the most potential out of your clover, keep watch on it and bush hog it also every time if blooms. You want to wait until about 75% of your blooms have turned brown, which is when the seed in the blooms have matured and are ready to be dispersed, and bush hog it then. What that does is puts the clover into panic mode as it thinks it didn’t do its job for the year. It will regenerate and bloom again. If mowed at the proper time, the clover will rebloom about every 30 days. Through the growing phases of clover, there is about a 10 day period in every 30 day cycle when it peaks very high in nutrients, palletability, and attractiveness to deer. If you do not mow it, it will bloom one major time, cycle through the above one major time, and kind of go dormant for the remainder of the year.

    Thanks for the great info…exactly what i needed to know…btw i planted the rye last fall but we have a short growing season

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