Arrow Saw Selection

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 contributors, and was last updated by kas1963 KAS1963 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • June 16, 2013 at 10:15 am #581278 Back to Top REPORT
    kas1963
    KAS1963

    Joined: 8/13/2009
    I am going to purchase a Weston arrow saw.¬† What is the reason for the different RPM’s?¬† Higher for Carbon, slower for aluminum, other way around?¬† Or just because we can.
    My daughter¬† is starting to shoot along with my son and I.¬† So not a lot of arrows.¬† Until my son (dad) try shooting 80 yards at the hay bail.¬† You just can’t find arrows after that{#emotions_dlg.mathews_laughing}¬† Unless thy hit the bee hives in behind.¬† Then nooo problem!¬† It’s fun with the kids.¬† Thanks.
    June 16, 2013 at 2:33 pm #581304 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
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    I have the Weston arrow saw, 8000 rpm. It is a very good ‘low end’ saw not meant for ‘production’ cutting.

    The 5000 rpm motors have sleeves/bushings instead of bearings, they wear out faster. It is money well spent to get the 8000 rpm saw.

    The dust collector is nice if you have a vacuum to attach to it, but I don’t find it necessary for cutting only a few dozen shafts a year. If I were in production business, I’d definitely have a dust collection system instead of just a mask from the local hardware store.

    The cut rate isn’t so much to do with the saw speed as with the disk grit. Slower speed, rougher grit, good for aluminum, not good for carbon¬†… higher speed, finer grit, smoother cut, go slow and steady for both metal and carbon. Slow speed saws generally have thicker blades.

    Check out Easton Arrow Tuning and Maintenance Guide, starting on page  17, it gives details on arrow cutting.
    http://www.eastonarchery.com/img/downloads/software/tuning_guide.pdf

    June 16, 2013 at 8:14 pm #581327 Back to Top REPORT
    kas1963
    KAS1963

    Joined: 8/13/2009
    Thanks.¬† That’s what I needed to know!

    One more question if I may.   Do you also use a squaring device after you cut?  Like the G5 ASD??

    I have also noticed with the smaller diameter arrows I have to use greater care with the offset of my vanes.

    I have constructed my own arrows for many years but recently I have been having a difficult time having them cut correctly.¬† I’ve had enough so I will cut my own!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by kas1963 KAS1963.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by kas1963 KAS1963.
    June 16, 2013 at 9:07 pm #581334 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
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    I do use a G5 ASD. I’ve made a habit of squaring both ends of the shaft, then swapping the cutter and squaring the face of the aluminum insert after installing it. I rarely have problems with broadhead alignment after that.

    With super-skinny shafts, you really can’t get much offset. This isn’t a problem for target shafts that only need .5¬ļ offset, but for hunting arrows you are much better off with a helical clamp that wraps the vane around the shaft. Of course, you then need a fall away rest since any shoot through rest will have fletch contact.

    June 17, 2013 at 1:26 am #581342 Back to Top REPORT

    sightpin

    Joined: 9/30/2012
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    Just got a new Cabela’s cut off saw. Its the 8000rpm model with dust collector. ¬†I have a pic of it under its own thread “What I got for father’s day”. ¬†I believe Apple makes this saw for Cabela’s . ¬†Cabela’s, ¬†I believe, ¬†just puts their logo on it.
    June 17, 2013 at 5:02 pm #581401 Back to Top REPORT
    kas1963
    KAS1963

    Joined: 8/13/2009
    With super-skinny shafts, you really can‚Äôt get much offset. This isn‚Äôt a problem for target shafts that only need .5¬ļ offset, but for hunting arrows you are much better off with a helical clamp that wraps the vane around the shaft.

    [/quote]
    Interesting. I use 2″blazers now.¬† Will they work with the helical? ¬† I remember playing with the helical clamps years ago with 4-5″ vanes.¬† I didn’t think the small vanes would work well. ¬† I was thinking more of the Twister style of vanes.

    June 17, 2013 at 6:44 pm #581414 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
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    You need a special jig for the 2″ vanes for helical fletch, like the Bohning Helix. It will work fine with the .232″ and .239″ diameter shafts. You can try a straight¬† 2¬ļ offset with the super-skinney shafts (.232″ and .239″), but I didn’t have much luck.

    I use FlexFletch FFP-360 vanes (3.6″) with a Bitz Helical Clamp on the VAP shafts with good results. With a straight clamp offset 2¬ļ I usually have problems with the FFP-360¬†vanes not adhering at the front and back tips.

    June 20, 2013 at 11:23 am #581601 Back to Top REPORT
    blackdog
    BlackDog

    Age: 63
    Joined: 7/21/2004
    June 22, 2013 at 1:07 pm #581765 Back to Top REPORT
    kas1963
    KAS1963

    Joined: 8/13/2009
    Ok,¬† so I bought the Weston 8000rpm saw.¬† From where you said BlackDog.¬† I haven’t received it yet.¬† I had read somewhere that when you are looking at a shafts straightness, that measurement is based from the middle of the shaft out a certain distance.¬† Not the full length of the arrow.¬† Thus, each end is not considered in this rating.¬† I thought I had saved this document, but I am unable to locate it.¬† I cannot remember the distance.¬†¬† If this is indeed true, you would have to trim off both ends.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by kas1963 KAS1963.
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