65lb or 60lb limbs vs 70 turned down – worth it?

Home Forums General Archery Discussion 65lb or 60lb limbs vs 70 turned down – worth it?

This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 contributors, and was last updated by gjarcher gjarcher 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • May 3, 2013 at 10:53 pm #576810 Back to Top REPORT

    cledford

    Joined: 12/28/2012
    I have a 70lb Chill (which I love BTW!) and it is my 2nd bow. My first bow was a Heli I sold due to shoulder issues in my bow arm. (pre-existing, old injury) The Heli was too jumpy for me and hurt my shoulder a couple of times getting away from me and me trying to wrangle it back to full draw.  I don’t have the issue with the chill. My question is that I shoot (in the case of the Heli shot) at about ~62 lbs. I’m slowly working up to about 65 – but I’m not sure if I’ll ever consistently draw 70 – it is too much wear and tear on the shoulder and really limits the number of arrows I can shoot in a session. So my question is – is there a reason to consider moving down to the 65 or 60 pound limbs? The dealers (I purchased each bow from a different Mathews dealer) seem to primarily stock mostly the 70lb variants although both stated they could order the lighter limbs – just that it was unnecessary as the lighter weighs didn’t gain anything at the top side, and were only useful to allow you to turn down further on the low side.

    Is this accurate, or is there a reason to shoot 65 or 60lb limbs (if shooting on the top side of the weight range) vs. turning down the 70s?  The rational at time of purchase was that I could always turn the bows up to 70lbs if I wanted to and was losing nothing by shooting under since I didn’t need to go less than 10lbs down.  I just want to make sure that the bow is optimally setup.  If I’m only ever going to pull 65 I’m wondering if the bow will run better with limbs maxed out, vs. with heavier limbs with limb bolts turned out.

    Just curious – thanks!

    -Calvin

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by  cledford.
    May 4, 2013 at 4:35 am #576817 Back to Top REPORT

    bowbuilder

    Joined: 11/6/2009
    I’d say if you are only going to shoot up to 65#, anything over 65#’s is wasted bow.

    That said…consider the effect that shooting a 70# max bow at less than 70 has on your draw length. As you lower the draw weight, you are increasing your draw length for that bow.

    Also, consider your shoulder. What if something happens again, and you need to go to a lower poundage, say 50# or 55#.  If you have a 60# or 65# model, you can at least lower down to 50 or 55# respectively and keep shooting. If you have a 70#, you might not be able to go low enough to suit your shoulder if you happen to injure it again.

    As far as efficiency advantages, I don’t think that really matters anymore for the new bows of today, or the effect is insignificant…but I could be wrong on that point.

    May 4, 2013 at 4:38 am #576818 Back to Top REPORT

    bowbuilder

    Joined: 11/6/2009
    By the way, I have a 60# Outback and a 65# HeliM. I don’t ever plan on shooting 70# ever again, and 65-66# is the max I like.
    May 4, 2013 at 7:03 am #576824 Back to Top REPORT
    buckknife
    buckknife

    Joined: 11/9/2005
    I shoot a 65 lb extreme,all i can say is i’ll never have a 70 lb bow ever again!
    May 4, 2013 at 10:23 am #576839 Back to Top REPORT
    blackdog
    BlackDog

    Age: 63
    Joined: 7/21/2004
    IMHO I’d go with 60 lbs and be happy. I used to shoot 70 for years. 2 years ago I started having problems and dropped down to shooting 57 lbs. Shoulder surgery was necessary. Not saying it was totally archery that caused the problem, but it’s a pretty good bet.

    Personally I feel that if a bow is getting away from you on let-down, you’re probably shooting too much weight.
    Sit down, draw and let down slowly. If you can’t do that confortably you’re shooting too much weight IMO.

    I figure a 60 lb bow is plenty.  Could hunt almost any game with the right arrows and since I doubt I’ll ever be able to hunt Africa I doubt anything more would be necessary.

    You didn’t say you had your shoulder fixed. If you still have a problem, don’t over-tax the shoulder.
    Is it worth it?  Can’t answer that. I do know that my shoulder surgery ran about $40K and recovery isn’t a lot of fun.

    My advise is to be kind to your shoulder. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_cool}

    May 5, 2013 at 8:45 am #576904 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    You don’t ‘lose’ anything by lowering the DW because of the huge limb pre-loading with the beyond parallel limbs, but you should be using 1/2″ shorter DL modules to compensate for the increase in DL. Also, the String Stop should be readjusted for the higher brace height.

    70# limbs are useful if you intend to hunt Very Large Game, like Yukon Moose, or Dangerous Game, like the Great bears, otherwise 70# limbs aren’t necessary and 60# limbs will take all game on the N. American Continent, including Elk.

    Is it worth investing more money to replace the 70# limbs at this point?… Probably not as long as you can shoot comfortably at 60-63# DW. Consider getting 60# limbs on your next bow … your shoulder will appreciate it. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

    May 6, 2013 at 6:31 pm #577096 Back to Top REPORT
    hotshot
    Hotshot

    Age: 54
    Joined: 11/1/2008
    Location: Oregon
    With todays equipment a guy can set up a low poundage bow that is wicked lethal. Very efficient.
    In my first years i used a 50 pound bear Kodiak recurve hunting deer, bear and elk. Obviously the distance was my enemy then.
    Now with todays Mathews…..wow. Like Brian and us other older guys will say, 60 to 65 pounds is bow enough to handle the animals most of us hunt each season. And yes, it saves on the body parts… {#emotions_dlg.mathews_wink}

    Let us know how it works out.

    {#emotions_dlg.mathews_arrow}

    >>>>--Shoot Straight-->
    May 6, 2013 at 7:14 pm #577106 Back to Top REPORT
    bowcrazy30-2
    bowcrazy30

    Age: 31
    Joined: 12/26/2012
    Location: New York
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    I agree I would also go with the 60lb limbs my friend.. Be kind to your shoulder
    May 6, 2013 at 7:47 pm #577110 Back to Top REPORT
    rabbit
    Rabbit

    Age: 48
    Joined: 1/23/2007
    Location: Indiana
    View My Bows

    You don’t ‘lose’ anything by lowering the DW because of the huge limb pre-loading with the beyond parallel limbs, but you should be using 1/2″ shorter DL modules to compensate for the increase in DL. Also, the String Stop should be readjusted for the higher brace height. 

    70# limbs are useful if you intend to hunt Very Large Game, like Yukon Moose, or Dangerous Game, like the Great bears, otherwise 70# limbs aren’t necessary and60# limbswill take all game on the N. American Continent, including Elk.

    Is it worth investing more money to replace the 70# limbs at this point?… Probably not as long as you can shoot comfortably at 60-63# DW. Consider getting 60# limbs on your next bow … your shoulder will appreciate it. {#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

    What Brian said!{#emotions_dlg.mathews_thumbs_up}

    May 7, 2013 at 10:16 am #577157 Back to Top REPORT
    gjarcher
    gjarcher

    Age: 71
    Joined: 10/3/2006
    Location: Colorado
    View My Bows
    FWIW, I have a 60/28 Monster AVS that I shoot at 63# max with a 463-gr 18% FOC arrow at 279 fps ( 80.2 KE) during Elk season, but for the rest of the year I back off to 55# or lower and use M7 65% DL mods. At 55# with a 275-gr 7% FOC arrow I get 325 fps for 3D (64.5 KE) and the bow is still very quiet … the only thing I’m losing is penetration potential.

    A 70# Chill backed out 5 full turns should be about 55# peak DW. If you replaced the limbs with 60# limbs, then backed off 1-¼ turns to about 55# peak draw weight, you’d be shooting the same arrow at about the same speed and about the same KE … the only difference would be a bit lower brace height with the 60# limbs and no new DL mods required, or a new set of DL mods with the 70# limbs, about a $25 – 30 cost.

    However, you could buy 60# limbs with a warranty then sell the 70# limbs on Archery Talk Classifieds, for about a $75 out of pocket for depreciation on used limbs and shipping/insurance, or you could post to Trade 70# limbs for 60# limbs with no warranty but only about $25 out of pocket for shipping/insurance.

    This is why I say replacing the 70# limbs with 60# limbs at this point is probably not worth the cost.

    … hope this helps.{#emotions_dlg.mathews_peace}

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